Diminished Scale



The diminished scale is a little strange sounding at first. Use this one over a dominant chord, a major triad when it is the V chord, or a power chord that functions as a V chord. It also must be one fret higher than the key of the chord. Use the A diminished scale over an Ab7 chord, an Ab major triad, or an Ab power chord.

Of course, it will work over a diminished chord. You won't be playing over too many of them in rock or metal lol.

This scale has four roots. In the key of A it is also in the key of C, Eb, and Gb.



Formula 1, 2, b3, 4, b5, b6, 6, 7



Alot of the scale patterns on this website may be played at two positions on the fretboard for the same key. If each note from a scale pattern is played one octave higher or lower, then the entire pattern can also be played one octave higher or lower. Twelve frets span the distance of one octave for any note on a single string. So any scale pattern may be played 12 frets above or below its position, as long as the guitar doesn't run out of frets.

If we look back at pattern #1 for the minor pentatonic scale. In the key of A, this pattern can be played at the fifth fret and one octave higher (twelve frets higher) at the seventeenth fret. Now look at pattern #2 for the minor pentatonic scale. In the key of A , this scale pattern can be played starting at the eigth fret and one octave higher starting at the twentieth fret. Pattern #3 for the minor pentatonic scale cannot be played at lower and higher octaves in the key of A. Due to it's location on the fretboard, the neck does not have twelve frets above or below it's position. But don't fret (pun intended) lol, this is not true for a number of other keys. For example, in the key of E, pattern #3 may be played starting at the fifth fret and one octave higher starting at the seventeenth fret.

Always keep in mind the possibility of playing scales at lower and higher octaves, so you can use them to fly up and down the fretboard!




Return To Minor Pentatonic From Diminished Scale




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